Research groups

Bechinger
Bianco
Braunstein
Cecchini
De Cola
Giuseppone
Hellwig
Hermans
Hosseini
Lehn
Lutz
Moran
Pfeffer
Robert
Rohmer
Samori
Sauvage
Wipff

Magnetic Resonance and Membrane Biophysics

Burkhard Bechinger

Burkhard Bechinger

The laboratory Membrane Biophysics and NMR studies complex chemical systems similar to those that occur in nature by physico-chemical approaches. By understanding the molecular interactions at an atomic, molecular and supramolecular level, macromolecular complexes are designed and tuned to exhibit new properties such as complexes for the transfection of nucleic acids or, to mention another example, lipid bilayer surfaces are used to regulate and tune polypeptide aggregation.

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Organic Nanomaterials and Delivery

Alberto Bianco

Alberto Bianco

The group led by Alberto Bianco develops an original research program based on Nanobiotechnology. The different research axes are related to the design, the synthesis and the study of the biomedical applications of carbon-based nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanotubes, graphene, adamantane). The group is exploring new chemical approaches for the multifunctionalization of carbon nanomaterials to impart multimodal capacities, such as targeting and imaging, with improved therapeutic efficacy. Some of these molecules are also able to self-assemble into nanoparticles.

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Chemistry of Coordination

Pierre Braunstein

Pierre BraunsteinThe study of the metal-ligand interactions is at the core of the activities of the Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry. We recently established that in 3c-2e M-C-H interactions, which are often responsible, at least in part, for the structure adopted by molecular complexes, the proximity between the metal and a C-H bond does not necessarily imply bonding interactions.
With Andreas Danopoulos and Vincent Robert, novel open-shell benzyl CrII organometallics were isolated and the remarkable angular distortions at the Cr-CH2-Ph sp3 carbon has been found by detailed theoretical analyses to have an intra- rather than an intermolecular origin. This finding is relevant to structural distortions in catalytically relevant complex systems.

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Engineering of the Molecular Functions

Marco Cecchini

Marco Cecchini

Computational approaches based on all-atom molecular dynamics provide the unique opportunity to monitor the time evolution of molecules with atomic resolution. The statistical analysis of these unique single-molecules “experiments” ultimately opens up to a quantitative understanding of molecular function. The group explores the principles of chemical design from small organic compounds to complex nanomachines by theoretical and computational approaches. The research interests span the domains of life science and material science.

 

 

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Supramolecular and Biomaterial Chemistry

Luisa De Cola

Luisa De ColaDe Cola's group research focuses on the creation of materials made either by self-assembly of small molecules or by porous silica.
The final aim is to obtain systems that can be used as electroluminescent film, or for biomedical imaging and theranostics. The luminescent small molecules are metal complexes which can be employed as dopant for organic light emitting diodes or as probe in electrochemiluminescent diagnostics devices.
The mesoporous silica is made as small particles (30-60 nm), amorphous and crystalline, and can be decorated internally and on the surface with biomolecules or labels. In vitro and in vivo imaging is under studying to show the possible use of these containers to deliver drugs and to act as imaging agent. In this respect, the group is particularly interested in materials that can degrade or excreted by the animal body.

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Supramolecular Chemistry and Self-Assemblies

Nicolas Giuseppone

Nicolas GiusepponeThe development of responsive, adaptive, and multitasking chemical systems is recognized as being of crucial importance to design the next generation of the so-called “smart” functional materials. One may expect that such advanced artificial systems should combine several features which are present in – and thus inspired by – living systems. In particular, these new materials should ultimately combine three key properties which are: i) the ability to be constructed in situ and “when needed” from the available sources, ii) the capacity to produce several tunable responses depending on environmental conditions, and iii) the possibility to amplify these responses by self-replication processes. The group attempts to demonstrate the possibility of designing artificial materials inspired by these concepts and which can be defined as autonomous, i.e. self-constructing material.

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Vibrationnal Spectroscopy and electrochemistry of biomolecules

Petra Hellwig

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Non-equilibrium Complex Systems

Thomas Hermans

Thomas Hermans

The group is studying dissipative self-assembling systems that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium, to obtain adaptive / dynamic materials that are “alive”. One of the hallmarks of complex systems is large scale "emergent" behavior (e.g., ordered patterns on length scales far beyond the size of the individual molecules forming the pattern), and this can only be achieved under non-equilibrium conditions. Understanding dissipative non-equilibrium is therefore one of the most important challenges at the interface between chemistry, biology, and physics. The group believes this is the way to get materials with a level of sophistication approaching that of living beings.

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Molecular Tectonics

Mir Wais Hosseini

Mir Wais Hosseini

The Molecular Tectonics laboratory is concerned by organization of matter in the crystalline phase. The conducted research deals with the design and generation of periodic complex architectures. These molecular assemblies of macroscopic size are obtained by self-assembly processes between programmed tectons bearing within their structure recognition and iteration codes. This approach not only allows the fabrication of designed crystals but also permits the preparation of crystals by a hierarchic strategy.

 

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Supramolecular Chemistry

Jean-Marie Lehn

Jean-Maire Lehn

Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) is based on the implementation of reversible covalent or non-covalent connections to allow a continuous change in constitution of a chemical entity by reorganization and exchange of building blocks on both the molecular and supramolecular levels. It takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow for variation and selection and achieve adaptation. CDC generates networks of interconverting constituents, constitutional dynamic networks, able to respond to perturbations by physical stimuli or to chemical effectors. It leads to adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards systems of increasing complexity and a science of complex matter.



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Precision Macromolecular Chemistry

Jean-François Lutz

Jean-François Lutz

An important objective of the group led by Jean-François Lutz at the Institut Charles Sadron is the synthesis of non-natural polymers containing regular sequences of monomers. Indeed, as learned from nature, primary structure control is a crucial aspect for attaining highly complex materials. This parameter is finely controlled in some biopolymers such as DNA or proteins but generally not in synthetic macromolecules. Within the frame of the Cluster Chemistry of Complex Systems, the group is aiming to develop complex molecular codes on linear polymer chains.

 

 

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Chemical Catalysis

Joseph Moran

Joseph Moran

Research in the area of the chemistry of complex systems involves the use of rapid, reversible covalent processes to enable dynamic combinatorial synthesis and screening of libraries of small organic catalysts against a target reaction. The group is also trying to bridge the gap between chemistry and biology by developing catalytic reactions and networks thereof that mimic the anabolic pathways found in living organisms.

 

 

 

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Syntheses Steelworker Led

Michel Pfeffer

Michel PfefferThe group led by Michel Pfeffer focuses on two specific and connected research axes in the framework of the Cluster Chemistry of Complex Systems. The first one is focuses on so-called van der Waals forces in the stabilisation of intra- or intermolecular organometallic structures; some examples long considered as chimeras, like hemi-chelates, were isolated as a stable form thanks to the major role of non-covalent interactions. The second axe, recently initiated, focuses on the development of multitask catalysts for the multi-substrate tandem catalysis, complex system by definition.

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Quantitative Chemistry

Vincent Robert

Vincent Robert

The research activity conducted in the Laboratory of Quantitative Chemistry of Strasbourg aims at describing the electronic properties of molecular architectures and materials based on theoretical approaches and developments. The complexity stems from inter- and intramolecular interactions dictated by electronic correlation, weak bonds and charge transfers. The inspection of such phenomena allows one to rationalize puzzling behaviors such as molecular magnetism, spin crossover, spintronics and molecular recognition.

 

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Chemistry and Biochemistry of Microorganisms

Michel Rohmer

Michel Rohmer

The group is interested in the biosynthesis of isoprene units in bacteria and plant plastids: electron and proton transfer in the reaction catalyzed by LytB/IspH and the complex of associated proteins involved in the reduction step.

 

 

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Nanochemistry

Paolo Samori

Paolo Samori

The main focus of the research activities in the Nanochemistry Laboratory is the development of unconventional methodologies, beyond the state-of-the-art, to offer new solutions for ever more complex nanoscale multifunctional organic-based logic applications. The group aims at mastering the principles of supramolecular chemistry (bottom-up), in combination with nanofabrication (top-down), to achieve a full control over the architecture vs. function relationship in organic or graphene based supramolecularly engineered nanostructured materials and devices that can express multiple yet independent complex functions.

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Organo-Mineral chemistry

Jean-Pierre Sauvage

Jean-Pierre Sauvage

The group is mostly interested in transition metal-incorporating electrochemically- or photochemically driven molecular machines consisting of interlocking compounds. In the framework of the Cluster of Excellence, the group is synthetizing novel muscle-like molecules, able to shrink or elongate under the action of a given signal. The new approach the team is working on takes advantage of the ability of figure-of-eight compounds to be contracted along a vertical axis while they are stretched out along a horizontally oriented axis.

 

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Molecular modelling and Simulation

Georges Wipff

Georges Wipff

Using Molecular Dynamics simulations, the group explores the interplay between multiple non-covalent competitive interactions in homogeneous or heterogeneous nano-solutions, to investigate fundamental processes like molecular recognition, molecular assembling, heterogeneities, nucleation and organization at the nanoscopic level. Special attention is devoted to ions, from solutes to components of liquids, to set-up rules of an "ionic sociology" in solutions and at their interfaces.

 

 

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